‘Advanced Energy Design Guide for Grocery Stores’ Available Photo by Stephen Chernin/Getty Images

‘Advanced Energy Design Guide for Grocery Stores’ Available

The publication provides recommendations for achieving 50-percent energy savings over the minimum requirements in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004.

Photo by Stephen Chernin/Getty Images

“Advanced Energy Design Guide for Grocery Stores,” the fifth in a series of publications providing recommendations for achieving 50-percent energy savings over the minimum requirements in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings, is now available.

Developed by energy professionals from ASHRAE, The American Institute of Architects, the Illuminating Engineering Society, the U.S. Green Building Council, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with support and funding provided by the DOE through NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), the guide focuses on grocery stores ranging in size from 25,000 to 65,000 sq ft with medium- and low-temperature refrigerated cases and walk-ins. For larger stores consisting of grocery and general merchandise, information in “Advanced Energy Design Guide for Grocery Stores” can be combined with that in “Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big-Box Retail Buildings.”

“Traditionally, the refrigeration and food service are considered independently from the rest of the building systems, and the HVACR is expected to meet the loads,” Paul Torcellini, chair of the committee that wrote “Advanced Energy Design Guide for Grocery Stores,” said. “An integrated approach looks at the building holistically and addresses issues such as HVAC humidity levels that are critical to the performance of the refrigeration system, refrigeration-system waste heat that can be used for hot water or conditioning the outside air, and food-service operation that generates lots of heat that must be removed. Adding doors to refrigerated cases reduces uncontrolled cooling, simplifies temperature control, and reduces system load. Better management of exhaust hoods and better selection of equipment reduces the food-service loads. Proper introduction of outside air that is semi-conditioned helps minimize cooking smoke and odors with minimal conditioning. These are just examples of how the pieces need to work together.”

Recommendations for achieving advanced levels of energy savings without detailed energy modeling or analysis are summarized in a table for each climate zone. Additionally, the guide discusses principles of integrated design and how they can be used to implement energy-efficiency strategies. A chapter devoted to interaction between refrigeration and other building systems also is included.

Case studies and technical examples throughout the guide illustrate the recommendations and demonstrate technologies in real-world applications.

In addition to achieving 50-percent energy savings over the minimum requirements in the 2004 version of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1, the recommendations in “Advanced Energy Design Guide for Grocery Stores” meet or exceed the minimum requirements in the 2013 version.

To download a free copy of “Advanced Energy Design Guide for Grocery Stores,” go to www.ashrae.org/freeaedg.

A print version of “Advanced Energy Design Guide for Grocery Stores” is available for $62 for ASHRAE members and $89 for non-members. Copies can be ordered by phone at 1-800-527-4723 (United States and Canada) or 404-636-8400, by fax at 678-539-2129, or online at www.ashrae.org/bookstore.

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