Study Shows Demand
 for LEED-Credentialed Professionals Is Growing zimmytws/iStock

Study Shows Demand
 for LEED-Credentialed Professionals Is Growing

The positions were in fields such as engineering, construction management, architecture, software development, sales management, property management, and interior design.

A study of job postings from across the United States shows demand for LEED-credentialed professionals grew 46 percent over a 12-month period, the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) recently announced.

The study, conducted by USGBC education partner Pearson using data provided by Burning Glass, found 9,033 job postings requiring a LEED credential from March 2013 to February 2014. The positions were in fields including mechanical, electrical, and civil engineering; construction management; architecture; software development; sales management; property management; and interior design.

A secondary study conducted by Pearson using data provided by Burning Glass found that from January 2014 to March 2014 LEED appeared in 59 percent of 2,354 postings for green-building-related positions in the United States. The second-most-required skill appeared in only 17 percent of the postings.

The LEED Accredited Professional (LEED AP) credential affirms advanced knowledge in specialized areas of green building, expertise in a particular LEED rating system, and competency in the certification process. It is suited for practitioners actively working on LEED projects.

The LEED Green Associate credential demonstrates a solid current understanding of green-building principles and practices. It is suited for professionals newer to the sustainability field or looking to gain experience and exposure to LEED, as well as product manufacturers, students, real-estate professionals, contractors, and the like.

To learn more about LEED credentialing, visit www.usgbc.org/credentials.

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