Vince Vaughn back Julianne Moore Jeff Goldblum and an unexpected guest in a scene from 199739s quotThe Lost World Jurassic Parkquot the sequel to quotJurassic Parkquot Photo by Getty Images Photo by Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

Vince Vaughn (back), Julianne Moore, Jeff Goldblum, and an unexpected guest in a scene from 1997's "The Lost World: Jurassic Park," the sequel to "Jurassic Park." (Photo by Getty Images)

HVAC in Popular Movies: Did Hollywood Get It Right?

.intro-with-toc #pagination-toc { float: right; width: 40%; display: none; } .intro-with-toc .summary, .intro-with-toc .products, .intro-with-toc .organizations { clear: left; width: 100%; } .intro-with-toc .description { background: none; } An engineer and film critic takes a look at 13 movies and three TV series whose makers were not about to let HVAC fundamentals get in the way of a good story. Jurassic Park (1993) The Poseidon Adventure (1972) Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory (1971) Aliens (1986) Community, seasons 2 and 3 (2011-2012) Ocean's Eleven (2001) 24, Season 5, episodes 12 and 13 (2006) Dr. No (1962) The Asphalt Jungle (1950) Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope (1977) Mission: Impossible (1996) Die Hard 2 (1990) Die Hard (1988) No Country for Old Men (2007) Adventures of Superman, Season 3, Episode 7: "Olsen's Millions" (1955) Entrapment (1999)  

Hollywood long has been known for—ahem—taking liberties with the truth (just ask any composite character). In this video gallery, longtime HPAC Engineering Editorial Advisory Board member Ron Wilkinson, a professional engineer who moonlights as a film critic, takes a look at 13 movies and three TV series whose makers were not about to let HVAC fundamentals get in the way of a good story.

 

Jurassic Park (1

Register to view the full article

Register on HPAC.com and gain access to premium content, including this article and much more.

Already a member? .

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish